11/13/2018

11.13.2018 | The Editors

ESSENTIAL #1: “MISSISSIPPI SENATOR, WHOSE RUNOFF OPPONENT IS BLACK, JOKES ABOUT ‘PUBLIC HANGING’” PHIL MCCAUSLAND, NBC NEWS

From the article: “A video of Sen. Cindy Hyde-Smith, R-Miss., who faces a runoff this month against an African-American Democrat, joking about attending "a public hanging" went viral Sunday as she insisted there was nothing negative about her remark.

"If he invited me to a public hanging, I'd be on the front row," Hyde-Smith said during a campaign stop in Tupelo, Mississippi. The man she was referring to was identified as a local rancher.”

ESSENTIAL #2: “AMERICA NEEDS A BIGGER HOUSE” THE EDITORIAL BOARD, THE NEW YORK TIMES

From the article: “We’re nearly two decades into the 21st century, so why is America still operating with a House of Representatives built for the start of the 20th?

The House’s current size — 435 representatives — was set in 1911, when there were fewer than one-third as many people living in the United States as there are now. At the time, each member of Congress represented an average of about 200,000 people. In 2018, that number is almost 750,000.

This would shock the Constitution’s framers, who set a baseline of 30,000 constituents per representative and intended for the House to grow along with the population. The possibility that it might not — that Congress would fail to add new seats and that district populations would expand out of control — led James Madison to propose what would have been the original First Amendment: a formula explicitly tying the size of the House to the total number of Americans.

The amendment failed, but Congress still expanded the House throughout the first half of the nation’s existence. The House of Representatives had 65 members when it was first seated in 1789, and it grew in every decade but one until 1920, when it became frozen in time.”

ESSENTIAL #3: “DEVAL PATRICK’S PRESIDENTIAL PROSPECTS” JEFFREY TOOBIN, THE NEW YORKER

From the article: “The election last week punctuated a season of political and societal cataclysms—the Kavanaugh hearings; the pipe bombs sent to President Trump’s critics; the murder of eleven congregants in a synagogue in Pittsburgh. Trump used his campaign appearances to inflame his supporters with lurid appeals to their fear of immigrants and other outsiders. The events gave Patrick and his potential Democratic rivals the chance, as they campaigned around the country, to demonstrate how they respond to the political frenzy of the Trump era. For his part, Patrick tried to turn down the heat. While enthusiastic for the Democratic candidates by his side, he kept his message positive, and warned against excessive negativity. In this, too, he was echoing the demeanor of No-Drama Obama, who showed little interest in channelling his supporters’ anger; hope, not hate, was his message. And yet, in the Trump era, for many Democrats thoughtful diffidence is out, and rage is in. Eric Holder, Obama’s former Attorney General and yet another possible Presidential candidate, responded to the fall’s events by amending Michelle Obama’s famous dictum of 2016. ‘When they go low,’ Holder said, ‘we kick them.’ Patrick, by contrast, went high.”

ESSENTIAL #4: “KYRSTEN SINEMA BEATS MARTHA MCSALLY TO BECOME ARIZONA’S FIRST FEMALE SENATOR” YVONNE WINGETT SANCHEZ AND RONALD J. HANSEN, ARIZONA REPUBLIC

From the article: “Democrat Kyrsten Sinema's unbreakable hold on Maricopa County, along with her overwhelming support in Martha McSally's Tucson-based congressional district, gave Sinema an edge Republicans could not erase in the race for Arizona's open U.S. Senate seat. 

The Associated Press called the Senate race for Sinema on Monday evening and Republican McSally tweeted her congratulations to Sinema.

‘I am so honored that Arizonans chose our vision of a better Arizona, and now it's time to get to work," Sinema told supporters gathered in Paradise Valley. "Arizonans had a choice between two very different ways forward. One focused on fear and party politics, and one focused on Arizona and the issues that mattered to Arizona families.’”

Today's EssentialsEditors