11/19/2018

11.19.2018 | The Editors

ESSENTIAL #1: “WEEKEND MIDTERMS UPDATE: DEMOCRATS CONCEDE FLORIDA AND GEORGIA BUT COMPLETE THEIR ORANGE COUNTY SWEEP” RACHEL WITHERS, VOX

From the article: “After a weekend full of midterm results, many of the most contentious outstanding 2018 elections have now been called. A number of high-profile Democrats have conceded following recounts, but the blue wave has continued in California.

Results are still being finalized, almost two weeks since election day — and for some, there may be many more weeks of waiting.”

ESSENTIAL #2: “IT’S OVER: BILL NELSON CONCEDES TO RICK SCOTT AFTER FLORIDA RECOUNT DEADLINE PASSES” DAVID SMILEY, MIAMI HERALD

From the article: “Democratic incumbent Bill Nelson conceded Florida’s race for U.S. Senate on Sunday, signaling the end of an 18-year run in Congress’ upper chamber and likely the close of a 46-year political career.

According to Gov. Rick Scott, who defeated Nelson in a race so close it required a manual recount, Nelson called to concede after the state posted official results in the race after 1 p.m. Nelson’s campaign says the outgoing senator will release a video statement at 3 p.m.

“I just spoke with Senator Bill Nelson, who graciously conceded, and I thanked him for his years of public service,” Scott said. in a statement sent by his campaign shortly after 2 p.m. “This victory would not be possible without the hard work of so many people. Now the campaign truly is behind us, and that’s where we need to leave it.”

Scott ultimately beat Nelson by 10,033 votes — or about 0.12 percent of the nearly 8.2 million votes cast in the race. The margin was so thin it triggered a mandatory machine recount on Nov. 10 and then an automatic manual recount Thursday.”

ESSENTIAL #3: “HOW DEMOCRATS TOOK BACK MICHIGAN” EDWARD ISAAC-DOVERE, THE ATLANTIC

From the article: “2016 haunts Democrats here. 10,704 votes. The smallest margin of a Trump win, but more than that, a perfect picture of the collapse of a state stacked with all the unions and traditions and demographics that should make for a big blue unbreakable coalition: Trump got fewer votes than George W. Bush received when he lostMichigan to John Kerry in 2004, and Hillary Clinton got 43,000 fewer votes in Detroit than Barack Obama did four years earlier.

A new conventional wisdom took root: the white working class had abandoned Democrats, union leadership was decimated, and union members were peeling off to the GOP. Women couldn’t win. Progressives couldn’t win. African Americans, particularly younger ones, wouldn’t turn out to vote for anyone not named Obama. Change had caught up with the Democrats. Macomb County was gone. The Upper Peninsula was Trump country. The blue wall was broken and wasn’t coming back…

…Debate what counts as a blue wave in the rest of the country, but there was a tsunami off the Great Lakes. It was enormous and swept over everything: governor, Senate, attorney general, two flipped House seats with two female alumnae of the Obama administration, plus another that put a Palestinian American woman in John Conyers’s old spot, five flipped state Senate seats, five flipped state House seats, all the way down to the state supreme court and the state university boards. They legalized recreational pot, and the vote wasn’t close. They banned gerrymandering. They created automatic voter registration and an absentee-ballot process, essentially a backdoor way to institute early voting, which together will almost certainly lock in long-term the gains Democrats made.”

ESSENTIAL #4: “REV. JAMES LAWSON, NONVIOLENT ADVOCATE, RECOMMENDED FOR CONGRESSIONAL GOLD MEDAL” ADELLE BANKS, RELIGION NEWS SERVICE

From the article: “The Rev. James Lawson, a United Methodist minister known for his advocacy of nonviolence in the civil rights era and beyond, has been recommended for a Congressional Gold Medal.

…More than a half dozen members of Congress, including civil rights veteran John Lewis and California Reps. Karen Bass and Barbara Lee, joined Khanna and Lawson at the Cannon House Office Building to support Khanna’s proposal and to praise Lawson for his decades of work. The medal is the highest civilian award given by Congress.

Lawson is renowned for training college students in Nashville, Tenn., in nonviolent protest so they could withstand harsh mistreatment as they defied Jim Crow laws by occupying segregated lunch counters.”

Editors