3/7/2019

ESSENTIAL #1: “DEMOCRATS HAVE UNITED AROUND A PLAN TO DRAMATICALLY CUT CHILD POVERTY” DYLAN MATTHEWS, VOX

From the article: “Sens. Michael Bennet (D-CO) and Sherrod Brown (D-OH) on Wednesday unveiled the latest version of their American Family Act — in my view, likely to be the single most important bill of the 116th Congress for the country’s poorest residents.

The bill, whose House counterpart is sponsored by Reps. Rosa DeLauro (D-CT) and Suzan DelBene (D-WA), almost certainly won’t pass this session. It comes from the Democratic Senate minority and might not get any Republican support. But if enacted, the bill would slash child poverty in the United States by over a third in a single stroke. Passing it would enact a child allowance in the United States, bringing us in line with our peers in Canada, the United Kingdom, and most of the rich world in guaranteeing a basic payment for the care of children.”

ESSENTIAL #2: “BORDER AT ‘BREAKING POINT’ AS MORE THAN 76,000 UNAUTHORIZED MIGRANTS CROSS IN A MONTH” CAITLIN DICKERSON, THE NEW YORK TIMES

From the article: “The number of migrant families crossing the southwest border has once again broken records, with unauthorized entries nearly double what they were a year ago, suggesting that the Trump administration’s aggressive policies have not discouraged new migration to the United States.

More than 76,000 migrants crossed the border without authorization in February, an 11-year high and a strong sign that stepped-up prosecutions, new controls on asylum and harsher detention policies have not reversed what remains a powerful lure for thousands of families fleeing violence and poverty.”

ESSENTIAL #3: “HOW DEMOCRATIC 2020 CANDIDATES DESCRIBE THEIR OWN POLICY PRIORITIES” PHILIP BUMP, THE WASHINGTON POST

From the article: “There is a challenge at the heart of covering political campaigns. Candidates often have complex positions on key issues that require extensive explication and analysis. But it can be tricky to get a sense for how those priorities rank and how any one candidate’s positions differ from those of their opponents.

We’re speaking here about the Platonic ideal of a voter, someone who actually does the research that would allow for such a comparison in the first place. Most — or, at least, many — voters simply don’t have the time or energy to do so. So how do we present policy positions in a way that allows for some contrasts and encourages people to learn more?

Here was my thinking: What if we asked campaigns themselves to summarize their views on issues, to help ease the vetting process for voters.”

ESSENTIAL #4: “LONG OVERLOOKED BY SCIENCE, PREGNANCY IS FINALLY GETTING THE ATTENTION IT DESERVES CAROLYN Y. JOHNSON, THE WASHINGTON POST

From the article: “The default assumption has long been — and, to a large extent, still is — that it’s essential to protect pregnant women from research, rather than ensure they benefit from its rapid progress. But concerted pressure from scientists and advocates is slowly beginning to change policy and research culture.

In January, an updated federal policy that governs protections for human research subjects went into effect, officially removing pregnant women from being listed as ‘vulnerable to coercion or undue influence,’ alongside children and ‘mentally disabled’ people.”